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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
is happening with pakistan. there are questions about whether or not pakistan is really our friend or our foe. the second thing about foreign policy experience, you do not have to have had extensive foreign policy experience to know how to listen to the experts. president obama just announced his withdrawal plan from afghanistan. he didn't listen to general petraeus. he didn't listen to admiral mullen. they have again on record as saying it was more aggressive than they thought. common sense says, you don't reduce your force by a third and announce it to your enemy in order to fulfill some political promise. what kind of foreign experience do you need to listen to your experts in order to be able to make the right decision? >> sean: you came under fire early in the campaign. i never saw you mad before. you got sick and tired of answering the question about muslims in your administration. >> yes. >> sean: a reporter asked you again and you off on him a little. tell us your real position and what happened? >> throughout my business career i've always hired the best people, irrespective of race,
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
.s. army's 101st airborne division, located along the afghanistan border with pakistan. later on, a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign with a focus on battleground and early primary states as well as the republican presidential field. the senate was scheduled to take a weeklong break for the july 4th holiday, but the majority leader decided to have senators return tomorrow to continue negotiations on the debt and deficit. on the floor, military operations in libya starting at 2:00 with a vote on moving the resolution at 5:00. the house is out for the july 4th holiday. lawmakers return to business at 2:00 on wednesday. the main work this week will be on defense spending for fiscal 2012. also expected is the flood insurance program. the house is live on c-span and the senate on the c-span2. on the "washington journal" tomorrow morning -- a reporter discusses the fund-raising efforts by 2012 presidential candidates and the national parties. then, a look at new report showing flaws and the criminal background check system used during firearm purchases. we will speak with
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)